Webinar Invite: Black Perspectives on Immmigration Reform


WEBINAR INVITATION   IMG_6060

BLACK PERSPECTIVES ON IMMIGRATION REFORM

 

Thursday February 28, 2013
2:00pm EST

RSVP HERE:  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4410770407843324160

 

During this engaging webinar panelists will discuss the current components of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) and how it may impact Black Immigrant and African American communities. Panelists will also provide informative analysis on the current immigration enforcement landscape; U.S. racism and how it informs the immigrant experience; and the root causes of global migration. This webinar will help diverse black communities and allies understand what we should be uplifting in this current wave of immigration reform.

 

Question and Answer Session will follow presentations.

 

Webinar panelists include:

 

Nunu Kidane, Priority Africa Network (PAN)
An activist originally from Eritrea, Nunu is a graduate of the University of California Berkeley and has worked in Africa related program and policy developments for over two decades. For the past nine years, Nunu has worked in grassroots mobilization of new African communities in the Bay Area and nationally.

 

Gerald Lenoir, Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI)
Gerald Lenoir has been a leader in progressive social movements for over 30 years.  He is currently the Director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration and a board member of the National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights.

 

Francesca Menes, Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC)
Francesca, the Policy and Advocacy Coordinator with the Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC), was born and raised in Miami, Florida in the community of Little Haiti. For 2 years, Francesca was the coordinator of a national network of organizations fighting for the designation of Haiti for Temporary Protected Status.

 

Abraham Paulos, Families for Freedom (FFF)
Abraham is the Executive Director of FFF, although he joined as a member, after facing immigration detention for a crime he did not commit. He was vindicated, but his experience moved him to advocate with others. Abraham is an Eritrean refugee, born in Sudan and raised in Chicago.