Coalition Urges Renewal of TPS for West Africa

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A national coalition of organizations, led by African Communities Together (ACT) is leading the charge urging the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to renew Temporary Protected Status for Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in the wake of the 2013 Ebola crisis. Though these countries were the hardest hit and are still in recovery, the TPS program granted to nationals currently living the in the U.S. from these nations was the shortest on record. DHS has until Friday September 30th to announce an extension. 

 

 


Kinship Action Call – Black Immigrants Beyond DACA/DAPA

The recent Supreme Court ruling, which halted President Obama’s executive action programs, made it clear that our movement needs a new, aggressive Kinship-Call-Flyerapproach to advancing justice for immigrants. Even after this egregious decision, mainstream groups continue to push the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. But as BAJI’s infographic on ‘Black Immigrants and DACA’ shows (see below), by and large, our communities have failed to reap the benefits of the program. It’s time to look to the future.
Join the Black Immigration Network on July 7, 2016 at 2PMPacific/ 5PM Eastern for Black Immigrants Beyond DACA/DAPA: A Kinship Action Call.
Register here for the call-in details, and read BAJI’s statement on the Supreme Court’s DAPA/DACA+ decision.
 
 
DACA’s Impact on Black Immigrants

DACA & Black Imms (1)


2016 Kinship Assembly – Black Love Beyond Borders

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Join the Black Immigration Network for the 2016 Kinship Assembly to be held in Los Angeles, CA April 8-10 2016. Visit www.BlackImmigration.net/Kinship for more information.

The Black Immigration Network (BIN) is a Kinship of organizations and individuals connecting, training and building towards policy and cultural shifts for a racial justice and migrant rights agenda. The Kinship Assembly, known for its rich content and camaraderie, brings together leaders from organizations and programs that serve, organize in, advocate for, and/or provide research for African, Afro-Caribbean, Afro-Latino and African American communities in the United States and that are run by members of these communities. The 2016 Assembly will include compelling plenary sessions, enriching workshops on a variety of topics, relationship building opportunities and an empowering, uplifting and strengthening space.


Connecting the Diaspora on International Migrants Day

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International Migrants Day is held annually on December 18 to recognise the efforts, contributions and rights of migrants worldwide. The Black Immigration Network (BIN) will gather in recognition of International Migrants Day  to hear from leaders in the U.S., Europe, Africa and the Caribbean via teleconference.

 

As Black people around the globe experience structural racism, xenophobia, religous intolerance and the adverse impacts of globalization, connecting across the diaspora to build a movement that protects the human rights and fundamental freedoms of migrants, is key to our liberation.

 

 

 


Black Leaders Respond to Texas v. U.S. Ruling from the 5th Circuit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Contact Tia Oso, National Organizer, BAJI
Phone: 347-410-5312  Email: info@BlackAlliance.org

 

BLACK IMMIGRANT AND AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERS RESPOND TO 5th CIRCUIT REJECTING DEFERRED ACTION APPEAL

RENEW CALLS FOR REAL SOLUTIONS TO BROKEN IMMIGRATION SYSTEM, RAISE CONCERNS OF  BLACK IMMIGRANTS

[New York, NY – November 10, 2015] On Monday the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirmed a lower court ruling blocking President Obama’s expanded deferred action measures announced in November 2014, including the Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) program. This much anticipated decision is as expected from the conservative leaning Fifth circuit. This ruling now opens the door for the Department of Justice to appeal to the Supreme Court for a review of DAPA and DACA’s legality before President Obama leaves office.“It is definitely no surprise that the Fifth Circuit court, which has previously been hostile to immigrants,  issued a ruling in favor of 26 hostile states, against an administration that is also hostile toward millions of immigrants,” says Opal Tometi, Executive Director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration and a co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter.

 

“While many immigrant rights advocates see a glimmer of hope in a favorable Supreme Court ruling, the fact remains that any decision by the court will only be a temporary fix, benefiting a tiny fraction of immigrant families that are currently suffering through the current immigration system, while increased enforcement continues to tear-apart immigrant families. Though Black immigrants are only about 10% of the foreign-born population in the U.S., they are detained and deported at five times the rate of their presence in the undocumented immigrant community. Decades-long backlogs for family visas keep loved-ones in limbo and create financial and emotional distress for millions.

 

Black immigrant families – even those eligible for relief under Obama’s quick-fixes – have yet to reap the benefits of administrative relief as black immigrants often remain overlooked and excluded from the immigration discourse. We continue to call on the Obama administration to work with Congress to end the hostility toward immigrants by providing true relief to families, and eliminating immigrant detention, local ICE collaboration programs like the Priority Enforcement Program, and mass deportations.” Tometi said.

 

BAJI and the Black Immigration Network renew our call for a fair, just and inclusive immigration system, which ensures that black immigrants are treated humanely and fairly and can bring all their contributions and talents to strengthen our culture, economy and communities.

 

The Black Immigration Network (BIN) is a national network of people and organizations serving black immigrant and African American communities who are focused on supporting fair and just immigration, as well as economic and social policies that benefit these communities and all communities of color in order to create a more just and equitable society.

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BIN Members Making News!

BIN Steering Committee member Francesca Menes of Florida Immigrant Coalition featured on Facing South Florida on CBS Miami.

BIN Steering Committee member Francesca Menes of Florida Immigrant Coalition featured on Facing South Florida on CBS Miami.

The Black Immigration Network is a national network of over 40 organizations as well as individuals leading and serving black immigrant and African American communities who are focused on supporting fair and just immigration, as well as economic and social policies that benefit these communities and all communities of color in order to create a more just and equitable society. These leaders are making news with their leadership, groundbreaking advocacy and raising issues of importance to Black communities. Check out this week’s BAJI Blog, the organization which hosts and coordinates BIN, highlighting some of the recent coverage.

 

 


New American Media Covers BIN Panel on Engaging African Immigrants

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New American Media Covers Black Immigration Network Panel on Engaging African Immigrants

 

On April 22, The Black Immigration Network partnered with University of Southern California’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration to present a panel on the sharp  increase of African immigrants migrating to California and what this means for engaging these communities in migrant rights, racial justice and other key causes. BIN Steering Committee member Nunu Kidane worked for several years to make this very important event happen. Amaha Kassa, Executive Director of African  Communities Together presented demographic analysis and BIN Natioanl Coordinator Tia Oso shared key insights into how to best engage African immigrants  and how important BIN is as a space for connecting African immigrants with other Black immigrants and African-Americans. Many BIN member organizations participated as attendees including Priority Africa Network, African Communities Public Health Coalition, African Advocacy Alliance and many individual  members from the Southern California region.

 

New American Media covered the event in  “Growing National Alliance: African Diaspora and Immigrant Rights Groups”: “BAJI’s founders “believed that blacks and immigration rights activists should be working together to fight racism and support immigration reform and they wondered, ‘Where are the black voices?’” said Gerald Lenoir, the first BAJI executive director, in an interview with New America Media.


Those voices are now being heard in cities throughout the country as BAJI and some civil rights groups representing African immigrants join with immigration rights advocates. They are calling for a broader social justice movement and – more recently – speaking out on issues related to police violence in black communities.

Some leading members of this emerging coalition met last week at Engagement and Mobilization of African Immigrants, a forum hosted by the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration at the University of Southern California.” FULL ARTICLE HERE.


Pew Issues Report on Rapid Growth of Black Immigrant Population

PEW Research Issues New Report on Black Immigrant Demographics in the US

 

A new report issued April  9 by the PEW Research Center shows rapidly growing numbers of black immigrants reshaping the overall black population in the United States over the last three decades.

 

A record 3.8 million foreign-born blacks now live in the United States, the report  says. The share of immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean, as a percentage of the U.S. Black population has grown from 3.1 percent of the black population in 1980 to 8.7 percent in 2013. By 2060, 16.5 percent of the U.S. black population will be foreign-born, the report says.

 

Pew Research Report Shows Rapidly Growing Black Immigrant Population

The report highlights what the Black Immigration Network (BIN) has been saying for many years, that Black immigrants are an increasingly significant part of Black communities in the U.S. This report is a reflection of how important BIN’s work is as a national network of people and organizations serving black immigrant and African American communities, focused on supporting fair and just immigration, as well as economic and social policies that benefit these communities.

 

Read the full report here:  Immigrants Are a Growing Share Among Black Americans … As the Black Immigrant Population Has More than Quadrupled Since 1980.


World Social Forum – Tunis

nunuInternational Human Rights Activist Nunu  Kidane Shares Updates from World Social Forum

 

At least 70,000 delegates representing more than 4,000 grassroots movements and organisations from 128 countries are participating in the five-day forum, which serves as an human rights centered space to counter  the Davos World Economic Forum, where top political leaders and business elites meet to discuss economic issues.

The event aims to provide a space for a mosaic of youth and labour unions, environmental and peace associations, as well as various communities and activists from across the globe to develop and put forward alternative ideas for a fairer society based on the principles of equality, reciprocity and solidarity.

Over 1,000 workshops will be held during the event, discussing a number of issues such as the fight against hunger, immigrant rights, labour rights in the global economy, gender equality, and climate change.

Nunu Kidane, past Director of Priority Africa Network, BIN Steering Committee and board member of Black Alliance for Just Immigration is attending the Forum. Follow her blog for updates  and perspectives throughout the week at: http://tuniswsf2015migration.blogspot.com/


“This Was My Friend”- Communities Respond to LAPD Murder of “Brother Africa”

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BLACK IMMIGRANT AND AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERS MOURN THE LOSS OF “BROTHER AFRICA”

africas wingsOn Sunday March 1,  Charley “Brother Africa” Leundeu Keunang, a 43 year old Cameroonian  immigrant living on Skid Row was killed by Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers. Members of Black Immigration Network in Los Angeles are actively involved in organizing the community to seek justice in his case. Read the Black Alliance for Just Immigration statement regarding this horrible tragedy.  (http://www.blackalliance.org/brotherafrica/) Follow #CantKillAfrica on social media for updates on ongoing actions.

 

Brother Africa’s death brings into focus the convergence of state violence in the lives of Black people, and particularly the implications for Black immigrants. Ota Omoruyi, a Nigerian immigrant and friend of Keunang told Complex: “Why did this happen? It’s a mystery to me. I didn’t know [his life] was going to end like this—he didn’t know it was going to end like this,” says Ota Omoruyi, a Skid Row resident from Nigeria. He’s known Africa for about six months, and calls him “Cameroon,” Africa’s home country. He wrote this nickname on a piece of cardboard that’s now the centerpiece of the memorial that stands where his friend once lived.

 

“I’ve never known him to be violent, I’ve never known him to be confrontational,” he says. “I’ve known him to be intellectual, and to talk with purpose. I cannot say what went on in his mind when the police came. But I know he was depressed for about a week, thinking about sending money home, to his people, and about getting out of homelessness.” Full Article Here